Why Women are More Likely to Die of a Heart Attack than Men

Published in NJ Heart and Lung News

Quick: Picture a person having a heart attack.

What image came to mind? A middle-aged man clutching his chest? That is the image most of us have of the average heart attack.

Yet cardiovascular disease, the leading cause of death in the United States, will kill six times as many women this year as it will men. Moreover, women, while less likely to have a heart attack than men, are also are less likely to survive one than men.

Why the disparity?

For one thing, women are more likely than men to have “atypical” heart attack symptoms. For example, while chest pain or pressure is the classic symptom of a heart attack, one study found that nearly half of women having a heart attack had no chest pain at all. Instead, these women reported only fatigue and shortness of breath.

In addition, because symptoms of heart attack in women are less known, women often wait longer than men to seek care. One study found the average time it took for a man to seek treatment for a heart attack was 16 hours. In a woman it was 54 hours.

And that can make all the difference. With heart attacks, time is of the essence. Eighty-five percent of the damage of a heart attack occurs within the first two hours.

For these reasons, everyone needs to be aware of the symptoms associated with heart attacks — both in men and in women.

Heart Attack Symptoms Common in Both Men and Women

  1. pain or discomfort in the chest
  2. pain in shoulders, neck, arm, or jaw
  3. sweating
  4. shortness of breath, which might lead to loss of consciousness
  5. feelings similar to heartburn or indigestion
  6. nausea or vomiting

Heart Attack Symptoms More Common in Men

  1. Chest pressure described as being like “an elephant sitting on my chest”
  2. Pain or discomfort on the right side of the chest

Heart Attack Symptoms More Common in Women

  1. Unexplained weakness or fatigue, which may last for several days
  2. Sleep disturbances
  3. Anxiety
  4. Throat discomfort 

The most important thing to remember, however, is that every heart attack is unique. Anyone experiencing any heart attack symptom — whether it is “typical” or not —should call 911 immediately and go to the hospital.

Regency Jewish has partnered with the area's leading cardiologists and pulmonologists to create the NJ Heart and Lung Center™, a program that:   

  • Reduces hospital readmissions and patient length of stay
  • Maximizes ability for patient to regain ADL skills and independence
  • Offers 24/7/365 physician coverage through on-site staff and advanced telemedicine program
  • Has an on-site sleep study program to unlock Medicare benefit for Bipap utilization upon discharge
  • Offers STAT availability of Labs, X-Ray and other diagnostic tools

Our Outcomes & Capabilities include: 

  • Individualized planning for every patient
  • Cardiologist and pulmonologist on site daily for immediate intervention
  • Specialized rehab & nursing protocols developed in partnership with leading cardiologists & pulmonologists
  • A plan proven to prevent readmission to the hospital and improve patient independence and functionality
  • Regular Communication Between Patient, Family, Staff & Physicians
  • Collaborative care planning with other physician & therapy specialists
  • Advanced staff education & training
  • Transitional care nurse & enhanced discharge-to-home process
  • Follow-up home visit within 24-48 hours
  • Educational material provided to patients & families

Regency prides itself on offering the very best of care in a patient-centered environment. This means always listening to our residents and patients and respecting their capabilities, while helping them to achieve maximum functionality and independence. And always maintaining the highest professional and quality standards in our staff and our facilities. Our 25 years of excellent care have led to us being awarded a Best Nursing Homes award by US News & World Today, a 5-Star rating by USA Today, and an A+ rating by the Better Business Bureau, among many other awards.   Contact us by clicking here.

 

 

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COPD: Just the FAQs

Published in NJ Heart and Lung News

What is COPD?

Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) is a progressive lung disease that most commonly includes emphysema and chronic bronchitis. While emphysema and bronchitis work differently — emphysema destroys the lungs’ air sacs, and bronchitis causes inflammation of bronchial tubes — what they, and other COPD diseases, have in common is the general increase in difficulty breathing. As many as 30 million people in America have COPD, but only 50% of them have been diagnosed with the disease.

What Are the Symptoms of COPD?

COPD is a progressive disease, with symptoms varying according to the stage of the disease.

Early-stage COPD symptoms include:

  • shortness of breath, particularly after exertion
  • a mild, recurrent cough
  • a frequent need to clear one’s throat, particularly in the morning

Mid-stage COPD symptoms include:

  • shortness of breath, even after mild exertion, such as walking
  • chest tightness
  • chronic cough
  • frequent respiratory infections
  • wheezing
  • fatigue

Late-stage COPD symptoms include:

  • weight loss, caused by the exertion of breathing
  • swollen legs, ankles, or feet

Since these symptoms can often be ascribed to other causes, many people with COPD do not realize they have the disease — until it becomes a medical emergency. Emergency treatment is needed if any of the following symptoms are present:

  • a blue-ish cast to the skin, particularly in the fingertips or lips
  • difficulty breathing
  • difficulty catching one’s breath
  • feeling lightheaded and confused
  • feeling that one’s heart is racing

What Causes COPD?

In developed countries, 90% of people with COPD are either smokers or former smokers. According to the COPD Foundation, between 20 and 30% of long-term smokers will develop COPD. In the developing world, COPD is also associated with poor ventilation in homes. Fumes from fuels used for heating and cooking are the main culprits.

Lung irritants, including air pollution, dust inhalation, and exposure to chemicals and fumes in the workplace,  can also cause COPD. In the United States, West Virginia’s coal mining industry makes it the Number One state for COPD.

How is COPD Treated?

There is no cure for COPD, but it can be managed with medication, oxygen therapy, and, in severe cases, surgery. Most private insurance plans, as well as Medicaid and Medicare, will pay for pulmonary rehabilitation for COPD. Pulmonary rehab includes exercise, therapeutic lifestyle changes, counseling, as well as strategies to manage one’s energy throughout the day.

Regency Jewish Heritage has partnered with the area's leading cardiologists and pulmonologists to form The NJ Heart and Lung Center™

Our program:

  • Reduces hospital readmissions and patient length of stay
  • Maximizes ability for patient to regain ADL skills and independence
  • Offers 24/7/365 physician coverage through on-site staff and advanced telemedicine program
  • Has an on-site sleep study program to unlock Medicare benefit for Bipap utilization upon discharge
  • Offers STAT availability of Labs, X-Ray and other diagnostic tools

Our Outcomes & Capabilities include:

  • Cardiologist and pulmonologist on site daily for immediate intervention
  • Specialized rehab & nursing protocols developed in partnership with leading cardiologists & pulmonologists
  • A plan proven to prevent readmission to the hospital and improve patient independence and functionality
  • Regular Communication Between Patient, Family, Staff & Physicians
  • Collaborative care planning with other physician & therapy specialists
  • Advanced staff education & training
  • Transitional care nurse & enhanced discharge-to-home process
  • Follow-up home visit within 24-48 hours
  • Educational material provided to patients & families

We offer the very best of care in a patient-centered environment. This means always listening to our residents and patients and respecting their capabilities, while helping them to achieve maximum functionality and independence. And always maintaining the highest professional and quality standards in our staff and our facilities. Our 25 years of excellent care have led to us being awarded a Best Nursing Homes award by US News & World Today, a 5-Star rating by USA Today, and an A+ rating by the Better Business Bureau, among many other awards.

Contact us by clicking here.

 

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Surprising Risk Factors for Heart Disease

Published in NJ Heart and Lung News

Heart disease is the leading cause of death in the United States. It is implicated in fully one-quarter of all US  deaths each year. We are all familiar with the risk factors for heart disease; they include smoking, high cholesterol, hypertension, obesity, a sedentary lifestyle, diabetes, and stress. But it turns out there are other risk factors that might surprise you.

The Flu

Research shows that someone is six times more likely to have a heart attack the week after having the flu than in the entire year before and after having it. While the reason for this is unknown, it certainly adds to the already abundant evidence that getting a flu shot every year is an important step to take for our health.

Gum Disease

Your dentist is not the only one who wants you to floss your teeth. Your cardiologist does, too. Research shows that bacteria that enters your system through your gums can cause inflamed arteries. So now you can consider taking care of your teeth and gums to also be taking care of your heart.

Loneliness

Who would have thought that loneliness is a risk factor for heart disease? Yet research shows that loneliness raises risk as much as secondhand smoke does. Feeling alone can cause both stress and high blood pressure, and both of these increase the odds of heart disease.

Noise

Noise is all around us: the sounds of people on their cell phones, the honking of cars on the street, even the constant hum of the appliances in our homes. Research has demonstrated that the constant noise around us causes a stress reaction, which in turn increases our risk of heart disease.

At the NJ Heart and Lung Center™, we create an individualized plan for each patient. This is proven to prevent readmission to the hospital, and to improve independence.  

Regency Jewish has partnered with the area's leading cardiologists and pulmonologists to create a program that:   

  • Reduces hospital readmissions and patient length of stay
  • Maximizes ability for patient to regain ADL skills and independence
  • Offers 24/7/365 physician coverage through on-site staff and advanced telemedicine program
  • Has an on-site sleep study program to unlock Medicare benefit for Bipap utilization upon discharge
  • Offers STAT availability of Labs, X-Ray and other diagnostic tools

Our Outcomes & Capabilities include: 

  • Cardiologist and pulmonologist on site daily for immediate intervention
  • Specialized rehab & nursing protocols developed in partnership with leading cardiologists & pulmonologists
  • A plan proven to prevent readmission to the hospital and improve patient independence and functionality
  • Regular Communication Between Patient, Family, Staff & Physicians
  • Collaborative care planning with other physician & therapy specialists
  • Advanced staff education & training
  • Transitional care nurse & enhanced discharge-to-home process
  • Follow-up home visit within 24-48 hours
  • Educational material provided to patients & families

Regency prides itself on offering the very best of care in a patient-centered environment. This means always listening to our residents and patients and respecting their capabilities, while helping them to achieve maximum functionality and independence. And always maintaining the highest professional and quality standards in our staff and our facilities. Our 25 years of excellent care have led to us being awarded a Best Nursing Homes award by US News & World Today, a 5-Star rating by USA Today, and an A+ rating by the Better Business Bureau, among many other awards.   Contact us by clicking here.

 

Read more...

Surprising Risk Factors for Heart Disease

Published in NJ Heart and Lung News

Heart disease is the leading cause of death in the United States. It is implicated in fully one-quarter of all US  deaths each year. We are all familiar with the risk factors for heart disease; they include smoking, high cholesterol, hypertension, obesity, a sedentary lifestyle, diabetes, and stress. But it turns out there are other risk factors that might surprise you.

The Flu

Research shows that someone is six times more likely to have a heart attack the week after having the flu than in the entire year before and after having it. While the reason for this is unknown, it certainly adds to the already abundant evidence that getting a flu shot every year is an important step to take for our health.

Gum Disease

Your dentist is not the only one who wants you to floss your teeth. Your cardiologist does, too. Research shows that bacteria that enters your system through your gums can cause inflamed arteries. So now you can consider taking care of your teeth and gums to also be taking care of your heart.

Loneliness

Who would have thought that loneliness is a risk factor for heart disease? Yet research shows that loneliness raises risk as much as secondhand smoke does. Feeling alone can cause both stress and high blood pressure, and both of these increase the odds of heart disease.

Noise

Noise is all around us: the sounds of people on their cell phones, the honking of cars on the street, even the constant hum of the appliances in our homes. Research has demonstrated that the constant noise around us causes a stress reaction, which in turn increases our risk of heart disease.

At the NJ Heart and Lung Center™, we create an individualized plan for each patient. This is proven to prevent readmission to the hospital, and to improve independence.  

Regency Jewish has partnered with the area's leading cardiologists and pulmonologists to create a program that:   

  • Reduces hospital readmissions and patient length of stay
  • Maximizes ability for patient to regain ADL skills and independence
  • Offers 24/7/365 physician coverage through on-site staff and advanced telemedicine program
  • Has an on-site sleep study program to unlock Medicare benefit for Bipap utilization upon discharge
  • Offers STAT availability of Labs, X-Ray and other diagnostic tools

Our Outcomes & Capabilities include: 

  • Cardiologist and pulmonologist on site daily for immediate intervention
  • Specialized rehab & nursing protocols developed in partnership with leading cardiologists & pulmonologists
  • A plan proven to prevent readmission to the hospital and improve patient independence and functionality
  • Regular Communication Between Patient, Family, Staff & Physicians
  • Collaborative care planning with other physician & therapy specialists
  • Advanced staff education & training
  • Transitional care nurse & enhanced discharge-to-home process
  • Follow-up home visit within 24-48 hours
  • Educational material provided to patients & families

Regency prides itself on offering the very best of care in a patient-centered environment. This means always listening to our residents and patients and respecting their capabilities, while helping them to achieve maximum functionality and independence. And always maintaining the highest professional and quality standards in our staff and our facilities. Our 25 years of excellent care have led to us being awarded a Best Nursing Homes award by US News & World Today, a 5-Star rating by USA Today, and an A+ rating by the Better Business Bureau, among many other awards.   Contact us by clicking here.

 

Read more...

Psychological Counseling Helps Patients with COPD

Published in NJ Heart and Lung News

In the United States, more than16 million Americans currently suffer from chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). According to the World Health Organization (WHO), this number is estimated to be 65 million people worldwide, with more than 3.5 million people dying from COPD in 2015. Moreover, experts predict that the numbers for this incurable disease will continue to rise in the coming decades.

COPD generally takes one of two forms: chronic bronchitis or emphysema. Both diseases are characterized by shortness of breath, difficulty breathing, and coughing. Understandably, one of the major consequences of this disease — which causes an individual to feel like they are suffocating — is anxiety.

Anxiety itself can be a difficult and dangerous illness to manage. When it is combined with COPD, it can also worsen the symptoms of COPD. Anxiety can have such a profound effect on patients suffering from COPD that the fear, and the increased inability to breathe that this anxiety provokes, often result in increased emergency room visits.

Recently a team of researchers at the NHS Foundation Trust along with colleagues at Newcastle University in the United Kingdom, tested the effectiveness of treating anxiety in patients with COPD using cognitive behavioral therapy. Their goal was to see if this approach would improve the quality of life for COPD sufferers, and to determine if a reduction in anxiety would lead to a reduction in the number of hospital visits.

The results of their study, published in the journal ERJ Open Research, demonstrated that patients treated with behavioral cognitive therapy experienced far fewer symptoms of anxiety, and reported an improved quality of life.

According to lead researcher Karen Heslop-Marshall, "Reducing the levels of anxiety patients experience has a significant impact on their quality of life as well as their ability to keep physically active and may improve survival in the long-term. Our research shows that frontline respiratory staff can deliver this intervention efficiently and effectively."

The researchers also pointed out that although the psychological intervention initially added costs to the care of patients with COPD, this cost was more than compensated by their need for fewer hospital visits.

The fact is that when dealing with any serious disease, both doctors and patients should be aware of the psychological effects the disease has on the patient. Giving patients the psychological support and techniques they need to deal with their illness can lead to a higher quality of life, a better survival rate, fewer hospital visits, and a reduction of the fear that accompanies a serious disease.

At the NJ Heart and Lung Center™ of Regency Jewish Heritage, we create an individualized plan for each patient. This is proven to prevent readmission to the hospital, and to improve independence.  

Regency Jewish has partnered with the area's leading cardiologists and pulmonologists to create a program that:   

  • Reduces hospital readmissions and patient length of stay
  • Maximizes ability for patient to regain ADL skills and independence
  • Offers 24/7/365 physician coverage through on-site staff and advanced telemedicine program
  • Has an on-site sleep study program to unlock Medicare benefit for Bipap utilization upon discharge
  • Offers STAT availability of Labs, X-Ray and other diagnostic tools

Our Outcomes & Capabilities include: 

  • Cardiologist and pulmonologist on site daily for immediate intervention
  • Specialized rehab & nursing protocols developed in partnership with leading cardiologists & pulmonologists
  • A plan proven to prevent readmission to the hospital and improve patient independence and functionality
  • Regular Communication Between Patient, Family, Staff & Physicians
  • Collaborative care planning with other physician & therapy specialists
  • Advanced staff education & training
  • Transitional care nurse & enhanced discharge-to-home process
  • Follow-up home visit within 24-48 hours
  • Educational material provided to patients & families

Regency prides itself on offering the very best of care in a patient-centered environment. This means always listening to our residents and patients and respecting their capabilities, while helping them to achieve maximum functionality and independence. And always maintaining the highest professional and quality standards in our staff and our facilities. Our 25 years of excellent care have led to us being awarded a Best Nursing Homes award by US News & World Today, a 5-Star rating by USA Today, and an A+ rating by the Better Business Bureau, among many other awards.   

Contact us by clicking here.

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Removal of a Tracheotomy Tube: A Delicate Process

Published in NJ Heart and Lung News

A tracheotomy (also known as a tracheostomy) is a surgical opening in the neck going into the trachea (windpipe). Tracheotomies allow air to get to the lungs when a person’s airway is compromised. The most common situations requiring a tracheotomy are those in which a person’s airway is blocked by a foreign body or a tumor; where there is a chest wall injury; where there are congenital abnormalities that block the airway; or if the person has a severe respiratory disorder.

Having a tracheotomy is not necessarily a permanent solution; if the patient no longer requires it, the tube is removed in a process known as decannulation.

Decannulation can take place when the following criteria are met:

  • The patient is alert, oriented, and able to follow directions
  • The patient is not dependent on a ventilator
  • The patient does not require excessively frequent suctioning of their secretions

Decannulation must be done with great care. It is only attempted after the patient demonstrates that they can tolerate it. In order to determine the patient’s ability to breathe on their own, the tube is usually downsized, then closed for twelve hours, and then for twenty-four hours. All of this is done under the close supervision of medical staff to ensure the patient experiences no respiratory difficulty at any stage.

After decannulation, patients need to be aware of a variety of warning signs. These include breathlessness, noisy breathing, pain, and signs of infection of the tracheotomy wound.

The best place to attempt decannulation is in a facility that specializes in pulmonary care, such as the NJ Heart and Lung Center, part of the Regency Nursing and Rehabilitation Centers. At the NJ Heart and Lung Center, we create an individualized plan for each patient. This is proven to prevent readmission to the hospital, and to improve independence.  

With the help of the area's leading cardiologists and pulmonologists, we have created a program that:   

  • Reduces hospital readmissions and patient length of stay
  • Maximizes ability for patient to regain ADL skills and independence
  • Offers 24/7/365 physician coverage through on-site staff and advanced telemedicine program
  • Has an on-site sleep study program to unlock Medicare benefit for Bipap utilization upon discharge
  • Offers STAT availability of Labs, X-Ray and other diagnostic tools

Our Outcomes & Capabilities include: 

  • Cardiologist and pulmonologist on site daily for immediate intervention
  • Specialized rehab & nursing protocols developed in partnership with leading cardiologists & pulmonologists
  • A plan proven to prevent readmission to the hospital and improve patient independence and functionality
  • Regular Communication Between Patient, Family, Staff & Physicians
  • Collaborative care planning with other physician & therapy specialists
  • Advanced staff education & training
  • Transitional care nurse & enhanced discharge-to-home process
  • Follow-up home visit within 24-48 hours
  • Educational material provided to patients & families

Regency prides itself on offering the very best of care in a patient-centered environment. This means always listening to our residents and patients and respecting their capabilities, while helping them to achieve maximum functionality and independence. And always maintaining the highest professional and quality standards in our staff and our facilities. Our 25 years of excellent care have led to us being awarded a Best Nursing Homes award by US News & World Today, a 5-Star rating by USA Today, and an A+ rating by the Better Business Bureau, among many other awards.   Contact us by clicking here.

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The Use of Beta-Blockers

Published in NJ Heart and Lung News

In 1964 pharmacologist James Block won the Nobel Prize in physiology and medicine for his development of the first beta blocker, propranolol.

Beta blockers are prescribed for numerous conditions. The most common are:

  • Angina (chest pain)
  • High blood pressure
  • Heart attack
  • Heart failure
  • Rapid pulse
  • Anxiety
  • Overactive thyroid or a tremor (beta blockers reduce the symptoms associated with these conditions)

Beta blockers work by stopping or reducing the chemical reactions that are caused by the body's natural fight or flight response. In particular, beta blockers prevent the hormones adrenaline and noradrenaline from affecting the sympathetic nervous system.

Although adrenaline and noradrenaline are important for preparing the body to handle dangerous situations, overexposure to these hormones can be extremely harmful. The most common symptoms of overexposure to these hormones are:

  • Rapid heartbeat
  • High blood pressure
  • Excessive sweating
  • Anxiety
  • Erratic heart rhythm or palpitations
  • Hyperventilation or fast breathing

Since beta blockers prevent the release of adrenaline and noradrenaline, they decrease the body's need for oxygen. Calming the body from needing excess oxygen helps to reduce anxiety. Both of these effects help decrease the stress placed upon the heart. In addition to these benefits, beta blockers also widen blood vessels, allowing for an easier and steadier flow of blood throughout the body.

Generally speaking, there are two types of beta blockers, selective and nonselective. Selective beta blockers mainly affect the heart. Nonselective beta blockers affect other parts of the body as well. Although beta blockers have some side effects, they are well-tolerated by most patients.

At the NJ Heart and Lung Center™ of Regency Jewish Heritage, we create an individualized plan for each patient. This is proven to prevent readmission to the hospital, and to improve independence.  

Regency Jewish has partnered with the area's leading cardiologists and pulmonologists to create a program that:   

  • Reduces hospital readmissions and patient length of stay
  • Maximizes ability for patient to regain ADL skills and independence
  • Offers 24/7/365 physician coverage through on-site staff and advanced telemedicine program
  • Has an on-site sleep study program to unlock Medicare benefit for Bipap utilization upon discharge
  • Offers STAT availability of Labs, X-Ray and other diagnostic tools

Our Outcomes & Capabilities include: 

  • Cardiologist and pulmonologist on site daily for immediate intervention
  • Specialized rehab & nursing protocols developed in partnership with leading cardiologists & pulmonologists
  • A plan proven to prevent readmission to the hospital and improve patient independence and functionality
  • Regular Communication Between Patient, Family, Staff & Physicians
  • Collaborative care planning with other physician & therapy specialists
  • Advanced staff education & training
  • Transitional care nurse & enhanced discharge-to-home process
  • Follow-up home visit within 24-48 hours
  • Educational material provided to patients & families

Regency prides itself on offering the very best of care in a patient-centered environment. This means always listening to our residents and patients and respecting their capabilities, while helping them to achieve maximum functionality and independence. And always maintaining the highest professional and quality standards in our staff and our facilities. Our 25 years of excellent care have led to us being awarded a Best Nursing Homes award by US News & World Today, a 5-Star rating by USA Today, and an A+ rating by the Better Business Bureau, among many other awards.   

Contact us by clicking here.

Read more...

What is Ejection Fraction?

Published in NJ Heart and Lung News

 

Medicare and most other insurers cover cardiac rehabilitation for people with Congestive Heart Failure (CHF) — but only if they have a “compromised ejection fraction.” What is “ejection fraction,” and why is it important?

Types of Congestive Heart Failure

Congestive Heart Failure occurs when the heart’s ability to pump blood to the body has decreased significantly. It is a chronic, long-term condition that worsens over time.

Congestive Heart Failure is usually divided into two types:

Heart Failure with preserved ejection fraction (HF-pEF), in which the heart is able to pump normally, but the ventricles (lower chambers) of the heart are stiffer and thicker than normal, and do not relax enough between beats to fill up normally with blood. Because the ventricles do not contain enough blood, not enough blood is pumped out to the body during heartbeats. HF-pEF is also known as Diastolic Heart Failure.

The risk of HF-pEF increases with age, and it is usually caused by other conditions, such as high blood pressure, diabetes, chronic kidney disease, atrial fibrillation, or Coronary Artery Disease (CAD).

Heart Failure with reduced ejection fraction (HF-rEF), in which the left ventricle (lower left chamber) of the heart is too weak to pump an adequate amount of blood to the body. HF-rEF is also known as Systolic Heart Failure.

People with reduced ejection fraction tend to have more hospitalizations and worse outcomes than those with preserved ejection fraction.

Ejection Fraction

Ejection Fraction is most commonly measured by echocardiogram, although MRIs and nuclear stress tests may also be used. These tests measure the amount of blood being pumped from the left ventricle each time the heart contracts. The results are given as a percentage of how much blood a healthy heart is able to pump. This percentage is known as the Ejection Fraction.

Compromised Ejection Fraction

Although in theory, “normal” blood flow should be 100%, in practice, even if the heart pumps considerably less blood it can still be considered to have a normal ejection fraction. If the heart is able to pump at least 50% of the blood in the left ventricle, the ejection fraction is considered normal. If the heart is able to pump less than 50% of the blood in the left ventricle, the ejection fraction is considered to be reduced or compromised. An ejection fraction of less than 35-40% is considered severely below normal. In cases of severely compromised ejection fraction, there is high risk of cardiac arrest.

For this reason, an ejection fraction of less than 40% often requires more intensive intervention, such as implanting a cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) or, less commonly, having a heart transplant. These interventions are serious enough to require cardiac rehab, and therefore Medicare and other insurers will pay for it.

Regency Jewish Heritage has partnered with the area's leading cardiologists and pulmonologists to form The NJ Heart and Lung Center™

Our program:

  • Reduces hospital readmissions and patient length of stay
  • Maximizes ability for patient to regain ADL skills and independence
  • Offers 24/7/365 physician coverage through on-site staff and advanced telemedicine program
  • Has an on-site sleep study program to unlock Medicare benefit for Bipap utilization upon discharge
  • Offers STAT availability of Labs, X-Ray and other diagnostic tools

 

Our Outcomes & Capabilities include:

  • Cardiologist and pulmonologist on site daily for immediate intervention
  • Specialized rehab & nursing protocols developed in partnership with leading cardiologists & pulmonologists
  • A plan proven to prevent readmission to the hospital and improve patient independence and functionality
  • Regular Communication Between Patient, Family, Staff & Physicians
  • Collaborative care planning with other physician & therapy specialists
  • Advanced staff education & training
  • Transitional care nurse & enhanced discharge-to-home process
  • Follow-up home visit within 24-48 hours
  • Educational material provided to patients & families

We offer the very best of care in a patient-centered environment. This means always listening to our residents and patients and respecting their capabilities, while helping them to achieve maximum functionality and independence. And always maintaining the highest professional and quality standards in our staff and our facilities. Our 25 years of excellent care have led to us being awarded a Best Nursing Homes award by US News & World Today, a 5-Star rating by USA Today, and an A+ rating by the Better Business Bureau, among many other awards.

Contact us by clicking here.

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Are you interested in The NJ Heart and Lung Center for yourself or someone you love? A member of our team will be happy to answer your questions and schedule an on-site tour. Of course, you can also call us anytime.

The NJ Heart and Lung Center at Regency Jewish Heritage
380 DeMott Lane, Somerset, NJ 08873
(732) 873-2000
Click Here

The NJ Heart and Lung Center at Regency Gardens
296 Hamburg Turnpike, Wayne, NJ 07470
(973) 790-5800
Click Here