NJ Heart and Lung News (26)

Cardiac Rehabilitation Following a Pacemaker

If you suffer from arrhythmias, such as bradycardia (a slower than normal heartbeat); heart block (a problem that disrupts electrical signals to the heart), or heart failure, your doctor may recommend insertion of a pacemaker. Pacemakers use electrical stimulation to prompt the heart to beat at a normal rate.

Pacemaker insertion is an inpatient procedure, usually performed under local anesthesia. Typically, if you receive a pacemaker, you will be allowed to go home within a day or two; in some cases, you may even be allowed to leave the same day.

Being discharged from the hospital does not mean that you are ready to go back to your regular activities, however. Not only do you need time to recover from the procedure, your best chances for full recovery involve enrolling in a cardiac rehabilitation program. Medicare and most private healthcare insurance companies cover the cost of cardiac rehabilitation after pacemaker procedures.

Cardiac rehabilitation involves not only tending to the implant site and making sure it remains infection-free, but also gives you instruction on how to take care of the device. A team of therapists will help you increase your activity safely and gradually. In addition to exercise training, cardiac rehabilitation programs include instruction on lifestyle changes, including diet and nutrition; and emotional support, in individual or group settings. The best cardiac rehab programs offer a multidisciplinary approach, with an individualized treatment plan for each patient, and continuous contact with your personal doctor to make sure you meet the goals they have set for you.

A study published in The Monaldi Archives for Chest Disease found that people who participated in cardiac rehabilitation after having a pacemaker inserted had an increase in quality of life, mental health, general health, and an increase in exercise capacity of 14 to 25%.

When you have cardiac rehabilitation at the NJ Heart and Lung Center™ of Regency Jewish Heritage, you will get an individualized plan, proven to prevent readmission to the hospital, and to improve your independence.  

Regency Jewish has partnered with the area's leading cardiologists and pulmonologists to create a program that:   

  • Reduces hospital readmissions and patient length of stay
  • Maximizes ability for patient to regain ADL skills and independence
  • Offers 24/7/365 physician coverage through on-site staff and advanced telemedicine program
  • Has an on-site sleep study program to unlock Medicare benefit for Bipap utilization upon discharge
  • Offers STAT availability of Labs, X-Ray and other diagnostic tools

Our Outcomes & Capabilities include: 

  • Cardiologist and pulmonologist on site daily for immediate intervention
  • Specialized rehab & nursing protocols developed in partnership with leading cardiologists & pulmonologists
  • A plan proven to prevent readmission to the hospital and improve patient independence and functionality
  • Regular Communication Between Patient, Family, Staff & Physicians
  • Collaborative care planning with other physician & therapy specialists
  • Advanced staff education & training
  • Transitional care nurse & enhanced discharge-to-home process
  • Follow-up home visit within 24-48 hours
  • Educational material provided to patients & families

Regency prides itself on offering the very best of care in a patient-centered environment. This means always listening to our residents and patients and respecting their capabilities, while helping them to achieve maximum functionality and independence. And always maintaining the highest professional and quality standards in our staff and our facilities. Our 25 years of excellent care have led to us being awarded a Best Nursing Homes award by US News & World Today, a 5-Star rating by USA Today, and an A+ rating by the Better Business Bureau, among many other awards.   Contact us by clicking here.

The Most Common Complications of COPD

COPD, Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease, is the acronym used for a group of lung conditions, including chronic bronchitis and emphysema, that progressively get worse over time. COPD prevents the lungs from working in an efficient manner and can lead to a wide range of complications.

The most common complications of COPD are:

1. Pneumonia

It is well-known that people with COPD are at far greater risk from pneumonia than people without COPD.

This risk is especially great in seniors: a study published in the medical journal PLOS ONE discovered that older adults with COPD were six times more likely to develop pneumonia than people without the disease.

2. Heart failure

Research from the Global Strategy for the Diagnosis, Management and Prevention of COPD suggests that approximately half of all people with COPD will go on to develop heart failure. As people age, the percentage of people with COPD and heart failure increases to nearly 70%.

3. Frailty

A study published in the journal Heart Lung has shown that 58% of people with COPD will become clinically frail. Frailty includes such disabling features as weight loss, muscle loss, fatigue, and decreased mobility.

4. Depression

Not surprisingly, COPD can lead to serious mental health issues, in particular to depression. As people find the number of things they can do getting fewer, their mental health often begins to suffer. Many things they once enjoyed they can no longer do, and many changes must be made in the way they live. A study published in the journal BMC Public Health has shown that the rate of depression among people with COPD was nearly twice as high as those without this serious disease.

It goes without saying that a chronic, progressive illness like COPD is associated with a high mortality rate. In fact, according to the American Lung Association, COPD is the third leading cause of death in the United States.

For people suffering from this disease it is important to see a doctor regularly, to take all prescribed medications, and, of course, to quit smoking. Furthermore, getting a vaccine for both the flu and pneumonia can prevent many possible complications. Maintaining a healthy lifestyle, including getting enough sleep, enough exercise, and eating a healthy diet, can help offset the dangers of this common yet serious disease.

Education, in the form of rehabilitation, is also important. Most private insurance plans, as well as Medicaid and Medicare, will pay for pulmonary rehabilitation for COPD. Pulmonary rehab includes progressive exercise, the introduction of therapeutic lifestyle changes, counseling, as well as strategies to manage one’s energy throughout the day.

At the NJ Heart and Lung Center™ of Regency Jewish Heritage, you will have an individualized plan, proven to prevent readmission to the hospital, and to improve your independence.  

Regency Jewish has partnered with the area's leading cardiologists and pulmonologists to create a program that:   

  • Reduces hospital readmissions and patient length of stay
  • Maximizes ability for patient to regain ADL skills and independence
  • Offers 24/7/365 physician coverage through on-site staff and advanced telemedicine program
  • Has an on-site sleep study program to unlock Medicare benefit for Bipap utilization upon discharge
  • Offers STAT availability of Labs, X-Ray and other diagnostic tools

Our Outcomes & Capabilities include: 

  • Cardiologist and pulmonologist on site daily for immediate intervention
  • Specialized rehab & nursing protocols developed in partnership with leading cardiologists & pulmonologists
  • A plan proven to prevent readmission to the hospital and improve patient independence and functionality
  • Regular Communication Between Patient, Family, Staff & Physicians
  • Collaborative care planning with other physician & therapy specialists
  • Advanced staff education & training
  • Transitional care nurse & enhanced discharge-to-home process
  • Follow-up home visit within 24-48 hours
  • Educational material provided to patients & families

Regency prides itself on offering the very best of care in a patient-centered environment. This means always listening to our residents and patients and respecting their capabilities, while helping them to achieve maximum functionality and independence. And always maintaining the highest professional and quality standards in our staff and our facilities. Our 25 years of excellent care have led to us being awarded a Best Nursing Homes award by US News & World Today, a 5-Star rating by USA Today, and an A+ rating by the Better Business Bureau, among many other awards. Contact us by clicking here.

What Is a Blood Gas Test?

When a person arrives at the ER with difficulty breathing, medical personnel have only moments to determine the cause.

Difficulty breathing can be caused by a wide variety of conditions, including but not limited to heart disease, kidney failure, or uncontrolled diabetes. Breathing difficulties can even be caused by chemical poisoning.

In an emergency situation, a doctor will order a number of tests, including a blood gas test. The test, also known as an arterial blood gas test (ABG) or a blood gas analysis, will help uncover the cause of the difficulty.

A blood gas test is not diagnostic by itself; it is usually accompanied by other tests. These typically include a urine test to check the function of the kidneys; chest x-rays and lung volume tests to test lung function; and blood counts for sodium, potassium, bicarbonate, and blood sugar.

The two most important results of the blood gas test are the blood pH level and the Partial Pressure of Oxygen (PO2) measurement.

A high blood pH level can be caused by:

  • Hyperventilation
  • Anxiety, pain
  • Anemia
  • Shock
  • Pulmonary disease
  • Congestive heart failure
  • Myocardial infarction
  • Hypokalemia (decreased potassium)
  • Gastric suctioning or vomiting
  • Antacid administration
  • Aspirin intoxication

A low blood pH level can be caused by:

  • Physical strain
  • Obesity
  • Starvation
  • Diarrhea
  • Ventilatory failure
  • Severe pulmonary disease
  • Severe congestive heart failure
  • Pulmonary edema
  • Cardiac arrest
  • Kidney failure
  • Lactic acidosis (overproduction or underutilization of lactic acid, usually caused by liver or kidney problems)
  • Ketoacidosis in diabetes (a serious condition in which the body produces excessive blood acids, called ketones)

The PO2 measurement reflects the amount of carbon dioxide gas dissolved in the blood. A low PO2 measurement suggests that the person is not getting enough oxygen. The cause for this might be chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), pulmonary fibrosis, or another problem with heart.

A high PO2 measurement suggests high levels of oxygen in the blood.

When moments count, it is important to have the best heart and lung doctors available to determine and implement the appropriate course of action.

At the NJ Heart and Lung Center™ of Regency Jewish Heritage, every patient has an individualized plan, proven to prevent readmission to the hospital, and to improve your independence.  

Regency Jewish has partnered with the area's leading cardiologists and pulmonologists to create a program that:   

  • Reduces hospital readmissions and patient length of stay
  • Maximizes ability for patient to regain ADL skills and independence
  • Offers 24/7/365 physician coverage through on-site staff and advanced telemedicine program
  • Has an on-site sleep study program to unlock Medicare benefit for Bipap utilization upon discharge
  • Offers STAT availability of Labs, X-Ray and other diagnostic tools

Our Outcomes & Capabilities include: 

  • Cardiologist and pulmonologist on site daily for immediate intervention
  • Specialized rehab & nursing protocols developed in partnership with leading cardiologists & pulmonologists
  • A plan proven to prevent readmission to the hospital and improve patient independence and functionality
  • Regular Communication Between Patient, Family, Staff & Physicians
  • Collaborative care planning with other physician & therapy specialists
  • Advanced staff education & training
  • Transitional care nurse & enhanced discharge-to-home process
  • Follow-up home visit within 24-48 hours
  • Educational material provided to patients & families

Regency prides itself on offering the very best of care in a patient-centered environment. This means always listening to our residents and patients and respecting their capabilities, while helping them to achieve maximum functionality and independence. And always maintaining the highest professional and quality standards in our staff and our facilities. Our 25 years of excellent care have led to us being awarded a Best Nursing Homes award by US News & World Today, a 5-Star rating by USA Today, and an A+ rating by the Better Business Bureau, among many other awards.   Contact us by clicking here.

What Is a Blood Gas Test?

When a person arrives at the ER with difficulty breathing, medical personnel have only moments to determine the cause.

Difficulty breathing can be caused by a wide variety of conditions, including but not limited to heart disease, kidney failure, or uncontrolled diabetes. Breathing difficulties can even be caused by chemical poisoning.

In an emergency situation, a doctor will order a number of tests, including a blood gas test. The test, also known as an arterial blood gas test (ABG) or a blood gas analysis, will help uncover the cause of the difficulty.

A blood gas test is not diagnostic by itself; it is usually accompanied by other tests. These typically include a urine test to check the function of the kidneys; chest x-rays and lung volume tests to test lung function; and blood counts for sodium, potassium, bicarbonate, and blood sugar.

The two most important results of the blood gas test are the blood pH level and the Partial Pressure of Oxygen (PO2) measurement.

A high blood pH level can be caused by:

  • Hyperventilation
  • Anxiety, pain
  • Anemia
  • Shock
  • Pulmonary disease
  • Congestive heart failure
  • Myocardial infarction
  • Hypokalemia (decreased potassium)
  • Gastric suctioning or vomiting
  • Antacid administration
  • Aspirin intoxication

A low blood pH level can be caused by:

  • Physical strain
  • Obesity
  • Starvation
  • Diarrhea
  • Ventilatory failure
  • Severe pulmonary disease
  • Severe congestive heart failure
  • Pulmonary edema
  • Cardiac arrest
  • Kidney failure
  • Lactic acidosis (overproduction or underutilization of lactic acid, usually caused by liver or kidney problems)
  • Ketoacidosis in diabetes (a serious condition in which the body produces excessive blood acids, called ketones)

The PO2 measurement reflects the amount of carbon dioxide gas dissolved in the blood. A low PO2 measurement suggests that the person is not getting enough oxygen. The cause for this might be chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), pulmonary fibrosis, or another problem with heart.

A high PO2 measurement suggests high levels of oxygen in the blood.

When moments count, it is important to have the best heart and lung doctors available to determine and implement the appropriate course of action.

At the NJ Heart and Lung Center™ of Regency Jewish Heritage, every patient has an individualized plan, proven to prevent readmission to the hospital, and to improve your independence.  

Regency Jewish has partnered with the area's leading cardiologists and pulmonologists to create a program that:   

  • Reduces hospital readmissions and patient length of stay
  • Maximizes ability for patient to regain ADL skills and independence
  • Offers 24/7/365 physician coverage through on-site staff and advanced telemedicine program
  • Has an on-site sleep study program to unlock Medicare benefit for Bipap utilization upon discharge
  • Offers STAT availability of Labs, X-Ray and other diagnostic tools

Our Outcomes & Capabilities include: 

  • Cardiologist and pulmonologist on site daily for immediate intervention
  • Specialized rehab & nursing protocols developed in partnership with leading cardiologists & pulmonologists
  • A plan proven to prevent readmission to the hospital and improve patient independence and functionality
  • Regular Communication Between Patient, Family, Staff & Physicians
  • Collaborative care planning with other physician & therapy specialists
  • Advanced staff education & training
  • Transitional care nurse & enhanced discharge-to-home process
  • Follow-up home visit within 24-48 hours
  • Educational material provided to patients & families

Regency prides itself on offering the very best of care in a patient-centered environment. This means always listening to our residents and patients and respecting their capabilities, while helping them to achieve maximum functionality and independence. And always maintaining the highest professional and quality standards in our staff and our facilities. Our 25 years of excellent care have led to us being awarded a Best Nursing Homes award by US News & World Today, a 5-Star rating by USA Today, and an A+ rating by the Better Business Bureau, among many other awards.   Contact us by clicking here.

What Is a Blood Gas Test?

When a person arrives at the ER with difficulty breathing, medical personnel have only moments to determine the cause.

Difficulty breathing can be caused by a wide variety of conditions, including but not limited to heart disease, kidney failure, or uncontrolled diabetes. Breathing difficulties can even be caused by chemical poisoning.

In an emergency situation, a doctor will order a number of tests, including a blood gas test. The test, also known as an arterial blood gas test (ABG) or a blood gas analysis, will help uncover the cause of the difficulty.

A blood gas test is not diagnostic by itself; it is usually accompanied by other tests. These typically include a urine test to check the function of the kidneys; chest x-rays and lung volume tests to test lung function; and blood counts for sodium, potassium, bicarbonate, and blood sugar.

The two most important results of the blood gas test are the blood pH level and the Partial Pressure of Oxygen (PO2) measurement.

A high blood pH level can be caused by:

  • Hyperventilation
  • Anxiety, pain
  • Anemia
  • Shock
  • Pulmonary disease
  • Congestive heart failure
  • Myocardial infarction
  • Hypokalemia (decreased potassium)
  • Gastric suctioning or vomiting
  • Antacid administration
  • Aspirin intoxication

A low blood pH level can be caused by:

  • Physical strain
  • Obesity
  • Starvation
  • Diarrhea
  • Ventilatory failure
  • Severe pulmonary disease
  • Severe congestive heart failure
  • Pulmonary edema
  • Cardiac arrest
  • Kidney failure
  • Lactic acidosis (overproduction or underutilization of lactic acid, usually caused by liver or kidney problems)
  • Ketoacidosis in diabetes (a serious condition in which the body produces excessive blood acids, called ketones)

The PO2 measurement reflects the amount of carbon dioxide gas dissolved in the blood. A low PO2 measurement suggests that the person is not getting enough oxygen. The cause for this might be chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), pulmonary fibrosis, or another problem with heart.

A high PO2 measurement suggests high levels of oxygen in the blood.

When moments count, it is important to have the best heart and lung doctors available to determine and implement the appropriate course of action.

At the NJ Heart and Lung Center™ of Regency Jewish Heritage, every patient has an individualized plan, proven to prevent readmission to the hospital, and to improve your independence.  

Regency Jewish has partnered with the area's leading cardiologists and pulmonologists to create a program that:   

  • Reduces hospital readmissions and patient length of stay
  • Maximizes ability for patient to regain ADL skills and independence
  • Offers 24/7/365 physician coverage through on-site staff and advanced telemedicine program
  • Has an on-site sleep study program to unlock Medicare benefit for Bipap utilization upon discharge
  • Offers STAT availability of Labs, X-Ray and other diagnostic tools

Our Outcomes & Capabilities include: 

  • Cardiologist and pulmonologist on site daily for immediate intervention
  • Specialized rehab & nursing protocols developed in partnership with leading cardiologists & pulmonologists
  • A plan proven to prevent readmission to the hospital and improve patient independence and functionality
  • Regular Communication Between Patient, Family, Staff & Physicians
  • Collaborative care planning with other physician & therapy specialists
  • Advanced staff education & training
  • Transitional care nurse & enhanced discharge-to-home process
  • Follow-up home visit within 24-48 hours
  • Educational material provided to patients & families

Regency prides itself on offering the very best of care in a patient-centered environment. This means always listening to our residents and patients and respecting their capabilities, while helping them to achieve maximum functionality and independence. And always maintaining the highest professional and quality standards in our staff and our facilities. Our 25 years of excellent care have led to us being awarded a Best Nursing Homes award by US News & World Today, a 5-Star rating by USA Today, and an A+ rating by the Better Business Bureau, among many other awards.   Contact us by clicking here.

What Is a Blood Gas Test?

When a person arrives at the ER with difficulty breathing, medical personnel have only moments to determine the cause.

Difficulty breathing can be caused by a wide variety of conditions, including but not limited to heart disease, kidney failure, or uncontrolled diabetes. Breathing difficulties can even be caused by chemical poisoning.

In an emergency situation, a doctor will order a number of tests, including a blood gas test. The test, also known as an arterial blood gas test (ABG) or a blood gas analysis, will help uncover the cause of the difficulty.

A blood gas test is not diagnostic by itself; it is usually accompanied by other tests. These typically include a urine test to check the function of the kidneys; chest x-rays and lung volume tests to test lung function; and blood counts for sodium, potassium, bicarbonate, and blood sugar.

The two most important results of the blood gas test are the blood pH level and the Partial Pressure of Oxygen (PO2) measurement.

A high blood pH level can be caused by:

  • Hyperventilation
  • Anxiety, pain
  • Anemia
  • Shock
  • Pulmonary disease
  • Congestive heart failure
  • Myocardial infarction
  • Hypokalemia (decreased potassium)
  • Gastric suctioning or vomiting
  • Antacid administration
  • Aspirin intoxication

A low blood pH level can be caused by:

  • Physical strain
  • Obesity
  • Starvation
  • Diarrhea
  • Ventilatory failure
  • Severe pulmonary disease
  • Severe congestive heart failure
  • Pulmonary edema
  • Cardiac arrest
  • Kidney failure
  • Lactic acidosis (overproduction or underutilization of lactic acid, usually caused by liver or kidney problems)
  • Ketoacidosis in diabetes (a serious condition in which the body produces excessive blood acids, called ketones)

The PO2 measurement reflects the amount of carbon dioxide gas dissolved in the blood. A low PO2 measurement suggests that the person is not getting enough oxygen. The cause for this might be chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), pulmonary fibrosis, or another problem with heart.

A high PO2 measurement suggests high levels of oxygen in the blood.

When moments count, it is important to have the best heart and lung doctors available to determine and implement the appropriate course of action.

At the NJ Heart and Lung Center™ of Regency Jewish Heritage, every patient has an individualized plan, proven to prevent readmission to the hospital, and to improve your independence.  

Regency Jewish has partnered with the area's leading cardiologists and pulmonologists to create a program that:   

  • Reduces hospital readmissions and patient length of stay
  • Maximizes ability for patient to regain ADL skills and independence
  • Offers 24/7/365 physician coverage through on-site staff and advanced telemedicine program
  • Has an on-site sleep study program to unlock Medicare benefit for Bipap utilization upon discharge
  • Offers STAT availability of Labs, X-Ray and other diagnostic tools

Our Outcomes & Capabilities include: 

  • Cardiologist and pulmonologist on site daily for immediate intervention
  • Specialized rehab & nursing protocols developed in partnership with leading cardiologists & pulmonologists
  • A plan proven to prevent readmission to the hospital and improve patient independence and functionality
  • Regular Communication Between Patient, Family, Staff & Physicians
  • Collaborative care planning with other physician & therapy specialists
  • Advanced staff education & training
  • Transitional care nurse & enhanced discharge-to-home process
  • Follow-up home visit within 24-48 hours
  • Educational material provided to patients & families

Regency prides itself on offering the very best of care in a patient-centered environment. This means always listening to our residents and patients and respecting their capabilities, while helping them to achieve maximum functionality and independence. And always maintaining the highest professional and quality standards in our staff and our facilities. Our 25 years of excellent care have led to us being awarded a Best Nursing Homes award by US News & World Today, a 5-Star rating by USA Today, and an A+ rating by the Better Business Bureau, among many other awards.   Contact us by clicking here.

A Heart Attack Glossary

If you or a loved one has had a heart attack, you will likely find yourself in a world filled with unfamiliar medical terms and acronyms.

A diagnosis of heart attack is distressing enough; there is no need to add confusion to the anxiety you may already feel.

Here is a brief glossary of the terms you are most likely to encounter if someone in your life has a heart attack.

Heart Attack

A heart attack occurs when there is at least one blockage in the arteries that carry blood to the heart. These blockages damage the muscle of the heart. The severity of the damage depends on a variety of factors, including the amount of blockage and how quickly medical intervention can be implemented.

Needless to say, a heart attack is a medical emergency, and the sooner medical intervention can be implemented, the better the chances of recovery.

Myocardial Infarction

Myocardial infarction is the medical term for heart attack. The two terms are interchangeable.

Cardiac Arrest

Cardiac arrest is not the same as a heart attack. Cardiac arrest refers to a condition in which the heart suddenly stops working. Heart attacks occur when arteries to the heart are blocked; cardiac arrest occurs when the electrical signals that stimulate the heart to pump blood are disrupted.

The two conditions are linked however: having had a heart attack is a risk factor for cardiac arrest.

Coronary Artery Disease

Coronary artery disease is a medical condition in which the arteries to the heart — the “coronary” arteries — are at least partially blocked. It can cause a variety of other conditions, including heart attack.

STEMI

A STEMI is the “classic” heart attack.

The term STEMI stands for ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction.

“ST-segment” refers to the section of an electrocardiogram (EKG) that records the interval between heartbeats. This interval is normally reflected on an EKG as short flat line. If it is elevated instead of flat, the patient has a “STEMI.”

STEMIs are the most severe type of heart attack.

NSTEMI

During an NSTEMI heart attack, the ST-segment remains flat. While they are often considered less “dangerous” than STEMI heart attacks, they still need immediate medical treatment. 30% of heart attacks are NSTEMIs.

Once medical intervention has taken place, the heart will have been stabilized; however, an extended period of rehabilitation is recommended to complete recovery and reduce the risks of another heart attack.

At the NJ Heart and Lung Center™ of Regency Jewish Heritage, you will have an individualized plan, proven to prevent readmission to the hospital, and to improve your independence.  

Regency Jewish has partnered with the area's leading cardiologists and pulmonologists to create a program that:   

  • Reduces hospital readmissions and patient length of stay
  • Maximizes ability for patient to regain ADL skills and independence
  • Offers 24/7/365 physician coverage through on-site staff and advanced telemedicine program
  • Has an on-site sleep study program to unlock Medicare benefit for Bipap utilization upon discharge
  • Offers STAT availability of Labs, X-Ray and other diagnostic tools

Our Outcomes & Capabilities include: 

  • Cardiologist and pulmonologist on site daily for immediate intervention
  • Specialized rehab & nursing protocols developed in partnership with leading cardiologists & pulmonologists
  • A plan proven to prevent readmission to the hospital and improve patient independence and functionality
  • Regular Communication Between Patient, Family, Staff & Physicians
  • Collaborative care planning with other physician & therapy specialists
  • Advanced staff education & training
  • Transitional care nurse & enhanced discharge-to-home process
  • Follow-up home visit within 24-48 hours
  • Educational material provided to patients & families

Regency prides itself on offering the very best of care in a patient-centered environment. This means always listening to our residents and patients and respecting their capabilities, while helping them to achieve maximum functionality and independence. And always maintaining the highest professional and quality standards in our staff and our facilities. Our 25 years of excellent care have led to us being awarded a Best Nursing Homes award by US News & World Today, a 5-Star rating by USA Today, and an A+ rating by the Better Business Bureau, among many other awards.   Contact us by clicking here.

Pacemakers and atrial fibrillation

Atrial fibrillation, often referred to as arrhythmia, is defined as having an irregular heartbeat. It can cause various heart conditions, including heart attack, heart failure, and stroke. When the heart functions properly, the muscles in the atria (the upper chambers of the heart) completely empty the blood contained in them into the ventricles (the lower chambers of the heart). However, when the electronic signals that cause the atria to contract function in a chaotic manner, blood can remain in the atria. Blood that remains in the atria can form a life-threatening clot.

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, there are approximately 6 million adults in the United States currently living with atrial fibrillation. The condition is age-related: only 2% of people younger than 65 years old have atrial fibrillation, while 9% of people over the age of 65 have it. In general, the older the population, the greater the risk of atrial fibrillation.

The main risk factors for atrial fibrillation are:

  1. High blood pressure
  2. Cardiovascular disease
  3. Hyperthyroidism
  4. Obesity
  5. Diabetes
  6. Lung or kidney disease
  7. Sleep apnea
  8. Stress and anxiety

When atrial fibrillation cannot be controlled by medications or behavioral modification, a pacemaker may be required. A pacemaker is a small electronic device which adjusts the electronic pulses of the heart, causing the heart to beat in a steady, regular rhythm. The surgery required to insert a pacemaker is considered relatively minor and safe.

Since prolonged atrial fibrillation can cause permanent damage to an individual's internal organs, as well as increase their risk of a heart attack or stroke, the importance of a pacemaker cannot be overstated. As mentioned above, the procedure to implant a pacemaker is relatively simple — but the effect it can have on a person's life is profound. When a person has a pacemaker implanted, many of the symptoms they may have been experiencing — including fatigue, shortness of breath, general weakness, and chest pain — will disappear.

Although aging tends to turn atrial fibrillation into a lifelong condition, pacemakers are a highly effective treatment. They tend to be relatively risk-free, and can help individuals with afib lead longer, healthier, and happier lives.

At the NJ Heart and Lung Center™ of Regency Jewish Heritage, you will have an individualized plan, proven to prevent readmission to the hospital, and to improve your independence.  

Regency Jewish has partnered with the area's leading cardiologists and pulmonologists to create a program that:   

  • Reduces hospital readmissions and patient length of stay
  • Maximizes ability for patient to regain ADL skills and independence
  • Offers 24/7/365 physician coverage through on-site staff and advanced telemedicine program
  • Has an on-site sleep study program to unlock Medicare benefit for Bipap utilization upon discharge
  • Offers STAT availability of Labs, X-Ray and other diagnostic tools

Our Outcomes & Capabilities include: 

  • Cardiologist and pulmonologist on site daily for immediate intervention
  • Specialized rehab & nursing protocols developed in partnership with leading cardiologists & pulmonologists
  • A plan proven to prevent readmission to the hospital and improve patient independence and functionality
  • Regular Communication Between Patient, Family, Staff & Physicians
  • Collaborative care planning with other physician & therapy specialists
  • Advanced staff education & training
  • Transitional care nurse & enhanced discharge-to-home process
  • Follow-up home visit within 24-48 hours
  • Educational material provided to patients & families

Regency prides itself on offering the very best of care in a patient-centered environment. This means always listening to our residents and patients and respecting their capabilities, while helping them to achieve maximum functionality and independence. And always maintaining the highest professional and quality standards in our staff and our facilities. Our 25 years of excellent care have led to us being awarded a Best Nursing Homes award by US News & World Today, a 5-Star rating by USA Today, and an A+ rating by the Better Business Bureau, among many other awards.   Contact us by clicking here.

Cardiac Rehabilitation for Heart Failure

 

Congestive Heart Failure (CHF) is the leading cause of hospitalization in seniors. In CHF, also called Chronic Heart Failure, the heart is weakened and cannot pump blood effectively.

CHF is not a death sentence, but it must be treated early and effectively. A variety of medications, including beta-blockers, diuretics, and ACE inhibitors are used in treatment of CHF, but lifestyle changes are also important. In fact, lifestyle changes can even reverse CHF.

What are the lifestyle changes that can make a difference? Eliminating tobacco and alcohol, restricting salt, being physically active, getting adequate amounts of quality sleep, and managing stress are important. However, they are easier listed than done. Unlearning bad habits built over a lifetime is no easy task.

The best way to establish these therapeutic lifestyle changes? According to an article published in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology, cardiac rehabilitation programs improve both quality-of-life and clinical outcome in patients with CHF.

A cardiac rehabilitation program such as the program offered at the NJ Heart and Lung Center will™ includes carefully guided exercise, as well as extensive support for therapeutic lifestyle changes.

While it was once thought that exercise was bad for people with CHF, today we know the answer is more nuanced. In order to help, not harm, a CHF patient, the exercise must be carefully controlled and monitored by knowledgeable therapists, who communicate regularly with the patient’s doctors.

A team approach, that incorporates physical therapists, occupational therapists, dietitians, social workers, and other healthcare personnel, is proven to be the most effective way to help people with CHF effect all the changes required to lead a healthy life.

At the NJ Heart and Lung Center™ of Regency Jewish Heritage, you will have an individualized plan, proven to prevent readmission to the hospital, and to improve your independence.  

Regency Jewish has partnered with the area's leading cardiologists and pulmonologists to create a program that:   

  • Reduces hospital readmissions and patient length of stay
  • Maximizes ability for patient to regain ADL skills and independence
  • Offers 24/7/365 physician coverage through on-site staff and advanced telemedicine program
  • Has an on-site sleep study program to unlock Medicare benefit for Bipap utilization upon discharge
  • Offers STAT availability of Labs, X-Ray and other diagnostic tools

Our Outcomes & Capabilities include: 

  • Cardiologist and pulmonologist on site daily for immediate intervention
  • Specialized rehab & nursing protocols developed in partnership with leading cardiologists & pulmonologists
  • A plan proven to prevent readmission to the hospital and improve patient independence and functionality
  • Regular Communication Between Patient, Family, Staff & Physicians
  • Collaborative care planning with other physician & therapy specialists
  • Advanced staff education & training
  • Transitional care nurse & enhanced discharge-to-home process
  • Follow-up home visit within 24-48 hours
  • Educational material provided to patients & families

Regency prides itself on offering the very best of care in a patient-centered environment. This means always listening to our residents and patients and respecting their capabilities, while helping them to achieve maximum functionality and independence. And always maintaining the highest professional and quality standards in our staff and our facilities. Our 25 years of excellent care have led to us being awarded a Best Nursing Homes award by US News & World Today, a 5-Star rating by USA Today, and an A+ rating by the Better Business Bureau, among many other awards.   Contact us by clicking here.

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Are you interested in The NJ Heart and Lung Center for yourself or someone you love? A member of our team will be happy to answer your questions and schedule an on-site tour. Of course, you can also call us anytime.

The NJ Heart and Lung Center at Regency Jewish Heritage
380 DeMott Lane, Somerset, NJ 08873
(732) 873-2000
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The NJ Heart and Lung Center at Regency Gardens
296 Hamburg Turnpike, Wayne, NJ 07470
(973) 790-5800
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