NJ Heart and Lung News (26)

Stable Angina vs Unstable Angina: What’s the Difference?

Angina pectoris is the medical term for chest pain caused by heart disease. It usually feels like pressure in the chest, but can also radiate to the shoulders, arms, back, neck, or jaw. Angina itself is not a disease, it is merely a symptom of underlying heart disease.

The two most common types of angina are stable angina and unstable angina.

Both types can occur when the heart is overworking, but here’s the crucial difference:

Stable Angina

The most common type of angina, stable angina, is considered “stable” because of its predictability: it usually occurs with activity or emotional stress. However, anything that makes the heart work harder or reduces how much oxygen it receives, can bring on an angina attack. Something as simple as cold weather can be a trigger, and even the “stress” of a very large meal can precipitate an attack. The pain of a stable angina attack does not get worse over time, and will usually go away after a few minutes of rest, or after taking angina medication.

While stable angina is not as serious as unstable angina, it can be painful, and indicates an increased risk of heart attack. For that reason, Medicare and other insurers will pay for cardiac rehabilitation for beneficiaries who have a current case of stable angina.

Unstable Angina

Unstable angina is unpredictable. It can occur with or without physical activity, and is not relieved by rest or angina medication. Unlike stable angina, the pain of unstable angina can get worse over a short period of time.

Unstable angina is an emergency condition, and it is often a precursor to a heart attack. If someone is suffering from an attack of unstable angina, it is important to get them emergency treatment right away.

Regency has partnered with the area's leading cardiologists and pulmonologists to create the NJ Heart and Lung Center™, a program that:   

  • Reduces hospital readmissions and patient length of stay
  • Maximizes ability for patient to regain ADL skills and independence
  • Offers 24/7/365 physician coverage through on-site staff and advanced telemedicine program
  • Has an on-site sleep study program to unlock Medicare benefit for Bipap utilization upon discharge
  • Offers STAT availability of Labs, X-Ray and other diagnostic tools

Our Outcomes & Capabilities include: 

  • Individualized planning for every patient
  • Cardiologist and pulmonologist on site daily for immediate intervention
  • Specialized rehab & nursing protocols developed in partnership with leading cardiologists & pulmonologists
  • A plan proven to prevent readmission to the hospital and improve patient independence and functionality
  • Regular Communication Between Patient, Family, Staff & Physicians
  • Collaborative care planning with other physician & therapy specialists
  • Advanced staff education & training
  • Transitional care nurse & enhanced discharge-to-home process
  • Follow-up home visit within 24-48 hours
  • Educational material provided to patients & families

Regency prides itself on offering the very best of care in a patient-centered environment. This means always listening to our residents and patients and respecting their capabilities, while helping them to achieve maximum functionality and independence. And always maintaining the highest professional and quality standards in our staff and our facilities. Our 25 years of excellent care have led to us being awarded a Best Nursing Homes award by US News & World Today, a 5-Star rating by USA Today, and an A+ rating by the Better Business Bureau, among many other awards.   

Contact us by clicking here.

Why Women are More Likely to Die of a Heart Attack than Men

Quick: Picture a person having a heart attack.

What image came to mind? A middle-aged man clutching his chest? That is the image most of us have of the average heart attack.

Yet cardiovascular disease, the leading cause of death in the United States, will kill six times as many women this year as it will men. Moreover, women, while less likely to have a heart attack than men, are also are less likely to survive one than men.

Why the disparity?

For one thing, women are more likely than men to have “atypical” heart attack symptoms. For example, while chest pain or pressure is the classic symptom of a heart attack, one study found that nearly half of women having a heart attack had no chest pain at all. Instead, these women reported only fatigue and shortness of breath.

In addition, because symptoms of heart attack in women are less known, women often wait longer than men to seek care. One study found the average time it took for a man to seek treatment for a heart attack was 16 hours. In a woman it was 54 hours.

And that can make all the difference. With heart attacks, time is of the essence. Eighty-five percent of the damage of a heart attack occurs within the first two hours.

For these reasons, everyone needs to be aware of the symptoms associated with heart attacks — both in men and in women.

Heart Attack Symptoms Common in Both Men and Women

  1. pain or discomfort in the chest
  2. pain in shoulders, neck, arm, or jaw
  3. sweating
  4. shortness of breath, which might lead to loss of consciousness
  5. feelings similar to heartburn or indigestion
  6. nausea or vomiting

Heart Attack Symptoms More Common in Men

  1. Chest pressure described as being like “an elephant sitting on my chest”
  2. Pain or discomfort on the right side of the chest

Heart Attack Symptoms More Common in Women

  1. Unexplained weakness or fatigue, which may last for several days
  2. Sleep disturbances
  3. Anxiety
  4. Throat discomfort 

The most important thing to remember, however, is that every heart attack is unique. Anyone experiencing any heart attack symptom — whether it is “typical” or not —should call 911 immediately and go to the hospital.

Regency Jewish has partnered with the area's leading cardiologists and pulmonologists to create the NJ Heart and Lung Center™, a program that:   

  • Reduces hospital readmissions and patient length of stay
  • Maximizes ability for patient to regain ADL skills and independence
  • Offers 24/7/365 physician coverage through on-site staff and advanced telemedicine program
  • Has an on-site sleep study program to unlock Medicare benefit for Bipap utilization upon discharge
  • Offers STAT availability of Labs, X-Ray and other diagnostic tools

Our Outcomes & Capabilities include: 

  • Individualized planning for every patient
  • Cardiologist and pulmonologist on site daily for immediate intervention
  • Specialized rehab & nursing protocols developed in partnership with leading cardiologists & pulmonologists
  • A plan proven to prevent readmission to the hospital and improve patient independence and functionality
  • Regular Communication Between Patient, Family, Staff & Physicians
  • Collaborative care planning with other physician & therapy specialists
  • Advanced staff education & training
  • Transitional care nurse & enhanced discharge-to-home process
  • Follow-up home visit within 24-48 hours
  • Educational material provided to patients & families

Regency prides itself on offering the very best of care in a patient-centered environment. This means always listening to our residents and patients and respecting their capabilities, while helping them to achieve maximum functionality and independence. And always maintaining the highest professional and quality standards in our staff and our facilities. Our 25 years of excellent care have led to us being awarded a Best Nursing Homes award by US News & World Today, a 5-Star rating by USA Today, and an A+ rating by the Better Business Bureau, among many other awards.   Contact us by clicking here.

 

 

Exercising Safely with Asthma

Asthma is characterized by a narrowing and swelling of the airways. During an asthma attack, breathing becomes difficult, which can lead to coughing and wheezing.

There are numerous causes for asthma, and a variety of stimuli that can trigger an attack. For example, although exercise does not cause asthma, it is a common trigger of asthma. The Asthma Foundation of America estimates that approximately 90% of people with asthma experience an attack when exercising, a condition referred to as exercise-induced bronchoconstriction (EIB).

Even for people without asthma, exercise and strenuous activity can cause a shortness of breath. However, for people with asthma, this shortness of breath can easily trigger an asthma attack.

Since exercise is fundamentally important to maintaining one's health, it is important for people with asthma to know the appropriate steps and medications required in order to exercise safely.

The main rules that people with asthma need to keep in mind in order to exercise safely include:

  1. Using a bronchodilator such as albuterol before exercising. This opens the airways, making an asthma attack less likely.
  2. Warming up before beginning any type of strenuous activity. Between 10 and 15 minutes of stretching and slow movements can help prepare the body for more strenuous exercises.
  3. Cold air is a well-known asthma trigger, and exercising in cold weather creates a double risk. In order to diminish this risk, it is useful to wear a scarf or some sort of mouth covering when exercising in cold weather. This can help warm up the cold air before it reaches the lungs.

Another technique is to breathe in through the nose rather than the mouth, which prevents cold, dry air from going directly into the lungs.

  1. It is important to know which types of weather conditions are unsuitable for exercise. For example, when it is extremely cold outside, or the air is highly polluted (whether outdoors or indoors, due to chemicals and cleaners), exercising with asthma is best avoided.

The takeaway message for those with asthma is that exercise is healthy —  when taking appropriate precautions. It is especially important for anyone with asthma to consult with their physician before starting any exercise program.

At the NJ Heart and Lung Center™, we create an individualized plan for each patient. This is proven to prevent readmission to the hospital, and to improve independence.  

Regency Jewish has partnered with the area's leading cardiologists and pulmonologists to create a program that:   

  • Reduces hospital readmissions and patient length of stay
  • Maximizes ability for patient to regain ADL skills and independence
  • Offers 24/7/365 physician coverage through on-site staff and advanced telemedicine program
  • Has an on-site sleep study program to unlock Medicare benefit for Bipap utilization upon discharge
  • Offers STAT availability of Labs, X-Ray and other diagnostic tools

Our Outcomes & Capabilities include: 

  • Cardiologist and pulmonologist on site daily for immediate intervention
  • Specialized rehab & nursing protocols developed in partnership with leading cardiologists & pulmonologists
  • A plan proven to prevent readmission to the hospital and improve patient independence and functionality
  • Regular Communication Between Patient, Family, Staff & Physicians
  • Collaborative care planning with other physician & therapy specialists
  • Advanced staff education & training
  • Transitional care nurse & enhanced discharge-to-home process
  • Follow-up home visit within 24-48 hours
  • Educational material provided to patients & families

Regency prides itself on offering the very best of care in a patient-centered environment. This means always listening to our residents and patients and respecting their capabilities, while helping them to achieve maximum functionality and independence. And always maintaining the highest professional and quality standards in our staff and our facilities. Our 25 years of excellent care have led to us being awarded a Best Nursing Homes award by US News & World Today, a 5-Star rating by USA Today, and an A+ rating by the Better Business Bureau, among many other awards.   Contact us by clicking here.

COPD: Just the FAQs

What is COPD?

Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) is a progressive lung disease that most commonly includes emphysema and chronic bronchitis. While emphysema and bronchitis work differently — emphysema destroys the lungs’ air sacs, and bronchitis causes inflammation of bronchial tubes — what they, and other COPD diseases, have in common is the general increase in difficulty breathing. As many as 30 million people in America have COPD, but only 50% of them have been diagnosed with the disease.

What Are the Symptoms of COPD?

COPD is a progressive disease, with symptoms varying according to the stage of the disease.

Early-stage COPD symptoms include:

  • shortness of breath, particularly after exertion
  • a mild, recurrent cough
  • a frequent need to clear one’s throat, particularly in the morning

Mid-stage COPD symptoms include:

  • shortness of breath, even after mild exertion, such as walking
  • chest tightness
  • chronic cough
  • frequent respiratory infections
  • wheezing
  • fatigue

Late-stage COPD symptoms include:

  • weight loss, caused by the exertion of breathing
  • swollen legs, ankles, or feet

Since these symptoms can often be ascribed to other causes, many people with COPD do not realize they have the disease — until it becomes a medical emergency. Emergency treatment is needed if any of the following symptoms are present:

  • a blue-ish cast to the skin, particularly in the fingertips or lips
  • difficulty breathing
  • difficulty catching one’s breath
  • feeling lightheaded and confused
  • feeling that one’s heart is racing

What Causes COPD?

In developed countries, 90% of people with COPD are either smokers or former smokers. According to the COPD Foundation, between 20 and 30% of long-term smokers will develop COPD. In the developing world, COPD is also associated with poor ventilation in homes. Fumes from fuels used for heating and cooking are the main culprits.

Lung irritants, including air pollution, dust inhalation, and exposure to chemicals and fumes in the workplace,  can also cause COPD. In the United States, West Virginia’s coal mining industry makes it the Number One state for COPD.

How is COPD Treated?

There is no cure for COPD, but it can be managed with medication, oxygen therapy, and, in severe cases, surgery. Most private insurance plans, as well as Medicaid and Medicare, will pay for pulmonary rehabilitation for COPD. Pulmonary rehab includes exercise, therapeutic lifestyle changes, counseling, as well as strategies to manage one’s energy throughout the day.

Regency Jewish Heritage has partnered with the area's leading cardiologists and pulmonologists to form The NJ Heart and Lung Center™

Our program:

  • Reduces hospital readmissions and patient length of stay
  • Maximizes ability for patient to regain ADL skills and independence
  • Offers 24/7/365 physician coverage through on-site staff and advanced telemedicine program
  • Has an on-site sleep study program to unlock Medicare benefit for Bipap utilization upon discharge
  • Offers STAT availability of Labs, X-Ray and other diagnostic tools

Our Outcomes & Capabilities include:

  • Cardiologist and pulmonologist on site daily for immediate intervention
  • Specialized rehab & nursing protocols developed in partnership with leading cardiologists & pulmonologists
  • A plan proven to prevent readmission to the hospital and improve patient independence and functionality
  • Regular Communication Between Patient, Family, Staff & Physicians
  • Collaborative care planning with other physician & therapy specialists
  • Advanced staff education & training
  • Transitional care nurse & enhanced discharge-to-home process
  • Follow-up home visit within 24-48 hours
  • Educational material provided to patients & families

We offer the very best of care in a patient-centered environment. This means always listening to our residents and patients and respecting their capabilities, while helping them to achieve maximum functionality and independence. And always maintaining the highest professional and quality standards in our staff and our facilities. Our 25 years of excellent care have led to us being awarded a Best Nursing Homes award by US News & World Today, a 5-Star rating by USA Today, and an A+ rating by the Better Business Bureau, among many other awards.

Contact us by clicking here.

 

Surprising Risk Factors for Heart Disease

Heart disease is the leading cause of death in the United States. It is implicated in fully one-quarter of all US  deaths each year. We are all familiar with the risk factors for heart disease; they include smoking, high cholesterol, hypertension, obesity, a sedentary lifestyle, diabetes, and stress. But it turns out there are other risk factors that might surprise you.

The Flu

Research shows that someone is six times more likely to have a heart attack the week after having the flu than in the entire year before and after having it. While the reason for this is unknown, it certainly adds to the already abundant evidence that getting a flu shot every year is an important step to take for our health.

Gum Disease

Your dentist is not the only one who wants you to floss your teeth. Your cardiologist does, too. Research shows that bacteria that enters your system through your gums can cause inflamed arteries. So now you can consider taking care of your teeth and gums to also be taking care of your heart.

Loneliness

Who would have thought that loneliness is a risk factor for heart disease? Yet research shows that loneliness raises risk as much as secondhand smoke does. Feeling alone can cause both stress and high blood pressure, and both of these increase the odds of heart disease.

Noise

Noise is all around us: the sounds of people on their cell phones, the honking of cars on the street, even the constant hum of the appliances in our homes. Research has demonstrated that the constant noise around us causes a stress reaction, which in turn increases our risk of heart disease.

At the NJ Heart and Lung Center™, we create an individualized plan for each patient. This is proven to prevent readmission to the hospital, and to improve independence.  

Regency Jewish has partnered with the area's leading cardiologists and pulmonologists to create a program that:   

  • Reduces hospital readmissions and patient length of stay
  • Maximizes ability for patient to regain ADL skills and independence
  • Offers 24/7/365 physician coverage through on-site staff and advanced telemedicine program
  • Has an on-site sleep study program to unlock Medicare benefit for Bipap utilization upon discharge
  • Offers STAT availability of Labs, X-Ray and other diagnostic tools

Our Outcomes & Capabilities include: 

  • Cardiologist and pulmonologist on site daily for immediate intervention
  • Specialized rehab & nursing protocols developed in partnership with leading cardiologists & pulmonologists
  • A plan proven to prevent readmission to the hospital and improve patient independence and functionality
  • Regular Communication Between Patient, Family, Staff & Physicians
  • Collaborative care planning with other physician & therapy specialists
  • Advanced staff education & training
  • Transitional care nurse & enhanced discharge-to-home process
  • Follow-up home visit within 24-48 hours
  • Educational material provided to patients & families

Regency prides itself on offering the very best of care in a patient-centered environment. This means always listening to our residents and patients and respecting their capabilities, while helping them to achieve maximum functionality and independence. And always maintaining the highest professional and quality standards in our staff and our facilities. Our 25 years of excellent care have led to us being awarded a Best Nursing Homes award by US News & World Today, a 5-Star rating by USA Today, and an A+ rating by the Better Business Bureau, among many other awards.   Contact us by clicking here.

 

Surprising Risk Factors for Heart Disease

Heart disease is the leading cause of death in the United States. It is implicated in fully one-quarter of all US  deaths each year. We are all familiar with the risk factors for heart disease; they include smoking, high cholesterol, hypertension, obesity, a sedentary lifestyle, diabetes, and stress. But it turns out there are other risk factors that might surprise you.

The Flu

Research shows that someone is six times more likely to have a heart attack the week after having the flu than in the entire year before and after having it. While the reason for this is unknown, it certainly adds to the already abundant evidence that getting a flu shot every year is an important step to take for our health.

Gum Disease

Your dentist is not the only one who wants you to floss your teeth. Your cardiologist does, too. Research shows that bacteria that enters your system through your gums can cause inflamed arteries. So now you can consider taking care of your teeth and gums to also be taking care of your heart.

Loneliness

Who would have thought that loneliness is a risk factor for heart disease? Yet research shows that loneliness raises risk as much as secondhand smoke does. Feeling alone can cause both stress and high blood pressure, and both of these increase the odds of heart disease.

Noise

Noise is all around us: the sounds of people on their cell phones, the honking of cars on the street, even the constant hum of the appliances in our homes. Research has demonstrated that the constant noise around us causes a stress reaction, which in turn increases our risk of heart disease.

At the NJ Heart and Lung Center™, we create an individualized plan for each patient. This is proven to prevent readmission to the hospital, and to improve independence.  

Regency Jewish has partnered with the area's leading cardiologists and pulmonologists to create a program that:   

  • Reduces hospital readmissions and patient length of stay
  • Maximizes ability for patient to regain ADL skills and independence
  • Offers 24/7/365 physician coverage through on-site staff and advanced telemedicine program
  • Has an on-site sleep study program to unlock Medicare benefit for Bipap utilization upon discharge
  • Offers STAT availability of Labs, X-Ray and other diagnostic tools

Our Outcomes & Capabilities include: 

  • Cardiologist and pulmonologist on site daily for immediate intervention
  • Specialized rehab & nursing protocols developed in partnership with leading cardiologists & pulmonologists
  • A plan proven to prevent readmission to the hospital and improve patient independence and functionality
  • Regular Communication Between Patient, Family, Staff & Physicians
  • Collaborative care planning with other physician & therapy specialists
  • Advanced staff education & training
  • Transitional care nurse & enhanced discharge-to-home process
  • Follow-up home visit within 24-48 hours
  • Educational material provided to patients & families

Regency prides itself on offering the very best of care in a patient-centered environment. This means always listening to our residents and patients and respecting their capabilities, while helping them to achieve maximum functionality and independence. And always maintaining the highest professional and quality standards in our staff and our facilities. Our 25 years of excellent care have led to us being awarded a Best Nursing Homes award by US News & World Today, a 5-Star rating by USA Today, and an A+ rating by the Better Business Bureau, among many other awards.   Contact us by clicking here.

 

The Facts about High Blood Pressure

High blood pressure, also known as hypertension, is the most common chronic medical condition in senior citizens. In fact, more than half of the people over the age of 65 in the United States are currently being treated for high blood pressure. Because the condition has no symptoms, it is estimated that the actual percentage of those with hypertension is actually much higher.

What Is Hypertension?

In hypertension, bloods flows through the blood vessels with too much force. This increases the amount of work your heart needs to do to process that blood, and also increases the wear and tear on the tissue of the arteries.

What Causes Hypertension?

There are several risk factors for hypertension. Some cannot be controlled, such as a family history of the condition, increasing age, and being male.

Many risk factors, however are controllable. These include:

  1. Overweight
  2. Smoking, including exposure to secondhand smoke
  3. High cholesterol levels
  4. Physical inactivity
  5. Stress

The following disorders also contribute to hypertension:

  1. Diabetes
  2. Kidney Disease
  3. Obstructive Sleep Apnea

How Can I Know If I Have Hypertension?

Hypertension is known as a “silent killer” precisely because you cannot know if you have it. The only way to find out if you have high blood pressure is to have your blood pressure checked regularly. Today, not only can you check your blood pressure at a medical visit, you can also do so for free in many pharmacies. There are also highly accurate blood pressure machines that can be purchased for under $50.

How Serious is Hypertension?

Very serious. Hypertension does not only damage your arteries and your heart, it impacts everywhere your blood goes — which is to say everywhere — including your kidneys, your eyes, and even your brain. And its impact is deadly. Approximately one-half of people with untreated hypertension will die of heart disease. One-third will die of stroke.

How is Hypertension Treated?

Hypertension requires a multi-pronged treatment plan, which includes addressing the risk factors that contributed to it. Getting your blood pressure under control is the first order of business, though. Expect to see your doctor once a month until your it comes under control. Reducing salt intake is also important for controlling hypertension.

Your doctor may also recommend one or more medications, depending on the severity of your hypertension, as well as on any other health conditions you may have.

At the NJ Heart and Lung Center™, we create an individualized plan for each patient. This is proven to prevent readmission to the hospital, and to improve independence.  

Regency Jewish has partnered with the area's leading cardiologists and pulmonologists to create a program that:   

  • Reduces hospital readmissions and patient length of stay
  • Maximizes ability for patient to regain ADL skills and independence
  • Offers 24/7/365 physician coverage through on-site staff and advanced telemedicine program
  • Has an on-site sleep study program to unlock Medicare benefit for Bipap utilization upon discharge
  • Offers STAT availability of Labs, X-Ray and other diagnostic tools

Our Outcomes & Capabilities include: 

  • Cardiologist and pulmonologist on site daily for immediate intervention
  • Specialized rehab & nursing protocols developed in partnership with leading cardiologists & pulmonologists
  • A plan proven to prevent readmission to the hospital and improve patient independence and functionality
  • Regular Communication Between Patient, Family, Staff & Physicians
  • Collaborative care planning with other physician & therapy specialists
  • Advanced staff education & training
  • Transitional care nurse & enhanced discharge-to-home process
  • Follow-up home visit within 24-48 hours
  • Educational material provided to patients & families

Regency prides itself on offering the very best of care in a patient-centered environment. This means always listening to our residents and patients and respecting their capabilities, while helping them to achieve maximum functionality and independence. And always maintaining the highest professional and quality standards in our staff and our facilities. Our 25 years of excellent care have led to us being awarded a Best Nursing Homes award by US News & World Today, a 5-Star rating by USA Today, and an A+ rating by the Better Business Bureau, among many other awards.   Contact us by clicking here.

Psychological Counseling Helps Patients with COPD

In the United States, more than16 million Americans currently suffer from chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). According to the World Health Organization (WHO), this number is estimated to be 65 million people worldwide, with more than 3.5 million people dying from COPD in 2015. Moreover, experts predict that the numbers for this incurable disease will continue to rise in the coming decades.

COPD generally takes one of two forms: chronic bronchitis or emphysema. Both diseases are characterized by shortness of breath, difficulty breathing, and coughing. Understandably, one of the major consequences of this disease — which causes an individual to feel like they are suffocating — is anxiety.

Anxiety itself can be a difficult and dangerous illness to manage. When it is combined with COPD, it can also worsen the symptoms of COPD. Anxiety can have such a profound effect on patients suffering from COPD that the fear, and the increased inability to breathe that this anxiety provokes, often result in increased emergency room visits.

Recently a team of researchers at the NHS Foundation Trust along with colleagues at Newcastle University in the United Kingdom, tested the effectiveness of treating anxiety in patients with COPD using cognitive behavioral therapy. Their goal was to see if this approach would improve the quality of life for COPD sufferers, and to determine if a reduction in anxiety would lead to a reduction in the number of hospital visits.

The results of their study, published in the journal ERJ Open Research, demonstrated that patients treated with behavioral cognitive therapy experienced far fewer symptoms of anxiety, and reported an improved quality of life.

According to lead researcher Karen Heslop-Marshall, "Reducing the levels of anxiety patients experience has a significant impact on their quality of life as well as their ability to keep physically active and may improve survival in the long-term. Our research shows that frontline respiratory staff can deliver this intervention efficiently and effectively."

The researchers also pointed out that although the psychological intervention initially added costs to the care of patients with COPD, this cost was more than compensated by their need for fewer hospital visits.

The fact is that when dealing with any serious disease, both doctors and patients should be aware of the psychological effects the disease has on the patient. Giving patients the psychological support and techniques they need to deal with their illness can lead to a higher quality of life, a better survival rate, fewer hospital visits, and a reduction of the fear that accompanies a serious disease.

At the NJ Heart and Lung Center™ of Regency Jewish Heritage, we create an individualized plan for each patient. This is proven to prevent readmission to the hospital, and to improve independence.  

Regency Jewish has partnered with the area's leading cardiologists and pulmonologists to create a program that:   

  • Reduces hospital readmissions and patient length of stay
  • Maximizes ability for patient to regain ADL skills and independence
  • Offers 24/7/365 physician coverage through on-site staff and advanced telemedicine program
  • Has an on-site sleep study program to unlock Medicare benefit for Bipap utilization upon discharge
  • Offers STAT availability of Labs, X-Ray and other diagnostic tools

Our Outcomes & Capabilities include: 

  • Cardiologist and pulmonologist on site daily for immediate intervention
  • Specialized rehab & nursing protocols developed in partnership with leading cardiologists & pulmonologists
  • A plan proven to prevent readmission to the hospital and improve patient independence and functionality
  • Regular Communication Between Patient, Family, Staff & Physicians
  • Collaborative care planning with other physician & therapy specialists
  • Advanced staff education & training
  • Transitional care nurse & enhanced discharge-to-home process
  • Follow-up home visit within 24-48 hours
  • Educational material provided to patients & families

Regency prides itself on offering the very best of care in a patient-centered environment. This means always listening to our residents and patients and respecting their capabilities, while helping them to achieve maximum functionality and independence. And always maintaining the highest professional and quality standards in our staff and our facilities. Our 25 years of excellent care have led to us being awarded a Best Nursing Homes award by US News & World Today, a 5-Star rating by USA Today, and an A+ rating by the Better Business Bureau, among many other awards.   

Contact us by clicking here.

Removal of a Tracheotomy Tube: A Delicate Process

A tracheotomy (also known as a tracheostomy) is a surgical opening in the neck going into the trachea (windpipe). Tracheotomies allow air to get to the lungs when a person’s airway is compromised. The most common situations requiring a tracheotomy are those in which a person’s airway is blocked by a foreign body or a tumor; where there is a chest wall injury; where there are congenital abnormalities that block the airway; or if the person has a severe respiratory disorder.

Having a tracheotomy is not necessarily a permanent solution; if the patient no longer requires it, the tube is removed in a process known as decannulation.

Decannulation can take place when the following criteria are met:

  • The patient is alert, oriented, and able to follow directions
  • The patient is not dependent on a ventilator
  • The patient does not require excessively frequent suctioning of their secretions

Decannulation must be done with great care. It is only attempted after the patient demonstrates that they can tolerate it. In order to determine the patient’s ability to breathe on their own, the tube is usually downsized, then closed for twelve hours, and then for twenty-four hours. All of this is done under the close supervision of medical staff to ensure the patient experiences no respiratory difficulty at any stage.

After decannulation, patients need to be aware of a variety of warning signs. These include breathlessness, noisy breathing, pain, and signs of infection of the tracheotomy wound.

The best place to attempt decannulation is in a facility that specializes in pulmonary care, such as the NJ Heart and Lung Center, part of the Regency Nursing and Rehabilitation Centers. At the NJ Heart and Lung Center, we create an individualized plan for each patient. This is proven to prevent readmission to the hospital, and to improve independence.  

With the help of the area's leading cardiologists and pulmonologists, we have created a program that:   

  • Reduces hospital readmissions and patient length of stay
  • Maximizes ability for patient to regain ADL skills and independence
  • Offers 24/7/365 physician coverage through on-site staff and advanced telemedicine program
  • Has an on-site sleep study program to unlock Medicare benefit for Bipap utilization upon discharge
  • Offers STAT availability of Labs, X-Ray and other diagnostic tools

Our Outcomes & Capabilities include: 

  • Cardiologist and pulmonologist on site daily for immediate intervention
  • Specialized rehab & nursing protocols developed in partnership with leading cardiologists & pulmonologists
  • A plan proven to prevent readmission to the hospital and improve patient independence and functionality
  • Regular Communication Between Patient, Family, Staff & Physicians
  • Collaborative care planning with other physician & therapy specialists
  • Advanced staff education & training
  • Transitional care nurse & enhanced discharge-to-home process
  • Follow-up home visit within 24-48 hours
  • Educational material provided to patients & families

Regency prides itself on offering the very best of care in a patient-centered environment. This means always listening to our residents and patients and respecting their capabilities, while helping them to achieve maximum functionality and independence. And always maintaining the highest professional and quality standards in our staff and our facilities. Our 25 years of excellent care have led to us being awarded a Best Nursing Homes award by US News & World Today, a 5-Star rating by USA Today, and an A+ rating by the Better Business Bureau, among many other awards.   Contact us by clicking here.

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Are you interested in The NJ Heart and Lung Center for yourself or someone you love? A member of our team will be happy to answer your questions and schedule an on-site tour. Of course, you can also call us anytime.

The NJ Heart and Lung Center at Regency Jewish Heritage
380 DeMott Lane, Somerset, NJ 08873
(732) 873-2000
Click Here

The NJ Heart and Lung Center at Regency Gardens
296 Hamburg Turnpike, Wayne, NJ 07470
(973) 790-5800
Click Here